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Planty Park

While visiting the Old Town, it is truly difficult to miss this park. It surrounds the area with a ring of trees and shrubbery. The park covers the area of approximately 4 km.

History of Planty park

It was created at the beginning of the 19th century as a replacement for dismantled fortifications. Their remains that can be admired even today are St. Florian’s gate, Barbican and three watchtowers. A moat that used to encompass the city was filled in with sand. Afterwards, numerous shrubs and trees were placed in the area. What is even more interesting, some exotic trees were imported from abroad, such as palm trees.
The park was exceptionally popular among contemporary citizens of the city. They were keen on spending time there as frequently as possible. A number of restaurants and hotels were built in a close proximity to the park.
In the 20th century, a cinema was opened in the area.
Unfortunately, the park was severely devastated by Germans during the Second World War.

Planty Park today

Nowadays, it is one of most popular meeting spots of Cracow citizens. They go there for walks, to jog, or to ride bikes.
One can also find atmospheric alleys and lanes full of comfortable benches and sculptures. Beautiful flowerbeds and fountains also have to be indicated.
We highly recommend to sit under a tree during summer and unwind while listening to the sound of approaching hooves, chirping of birds, and sounds of piano played in the nearby music school.

Planty Park looks absolutely stunning regardless of season.

In a close vicinity, there are several cafes, as well as numerous tourist attractions, such as the Church of St. Francis of Assisi, papal window, Juliusz Słowacki Theatre, etc.

Sculpture of Our Lady of Grace

While in the Planty Park, one should also take a look at the baroque sculpture of Our Lady of Grace, which is situated at the exit of the Jagiellońska Street.

The figurine was formerly a decoration of the gateway to the cemetery next to the St. Mary’s Basilica. There is a beautiful legend connected with the sculpture.

It is believed that a soldier who was still alive was buried in a collective grave in the commentary next to St. Mary’s Basilica. The soldier was, however, rescued and his mother founded the figurine as a token of gratitude.